Fall Projects

In my mind I was going to create one of those catchy slide shows…you know, the ones that click through 100 amazing photos in 2.5 minutes accompanied by some up-beat music…that’s why it’s been so long since the last posting. But the weather has been spectacular and I’ve found a thousand reasons not to be in the office doing computer chores…so here are a few of the photos that may some day make it into the snappy slide show…

Our last two weeks in snips:

This Fall's honey harvest was bountiful...and the honey tastes of apple blossoms.  It's going to be a sweet winter!
This Fall’s honey harvest was bountiful…and the honey tastes of apple blossoms. It’s going to be a sweet winter!
Tray after tray of honey cells...interestingly the color of the honey is the same color I get when we dye our wool with oregano plants.
Tray after tray of honey cells…interestingly the color of the honey is the same color I get when we dye our wool with oregano plants.

I spent Columbus Day Weekend on Deer Isle at the Haystack School of Crafts. The program is open by lottery and I won a slot in the Blacksmithing class…it was SO MUCH fun…exhausting and exhilarating at the same time. I loved the molten metal and being surrounded by all of the artistic souls…the hammering was seriously hard work. Steven stayed home and kept the campground running smoothly…how lucky am I?

Arriving at Haystack on Friday afternoon...3 days of learning the art of blacksmithing for Astrig...heaven.
Arriving at Haystack on Friday afternoon…3 days of learning the art of blacksmithing for Astrig…heaven.
My principal project was a door handle shaped like a honey bee for the pizza oven Steve is building at the studio.  Doug Wilson was a fantastic teacher...that's me with the acetylene torch (just a few days ago I didn't know what acetylene was)
I wanted to make a door handle for the new pizza oven…a honey bee of course. Doug was a fantastic teacher…that’s me with the acetylene torch to make the coil for the bee’s body. (just a few days ago I didn’t know what acetylene was)
I wanted to make a door handle for the new pizza oven...a honey bee of course.  This is Jeff Towe of Mount Desert Island.  He was the Blacksmith's assistant...a full artist in his own right and such a wonderful teacher...he guided me through the bee...and did the heavy pounding so that I wouldn't feel bad.
This is Jeff Towe of Mount Desert Island. He was the Blacksmith’s assistant…a full artist in his own right and such a wonderful teacher…he guided me through the bee…and did the heavy pounding so that I wouldn’t feel bad.
Hanging out...gorgeous
Hanging out
Steven started the pizza oven at the art studio...he's using clay from the property.
Steven started the pizza oven at the art studio with Mike and Larry on Columbus Day Weekend using blue clay from the property
Getting taller...
Getting taller…
Today's the day we harvest the wool
We’ve harvested all the fall wool…pounds and pounds of mohair for winter spinning projects
Betsy helped me shear Trevor...as she scratches his ears I clip.  It takes a real sheep shearer about 8 minutes to clean an animal...we took about 4 hours to get the job done but can report happily that we didn't draw blood
Betsy helped shear Trevor…while she scratches his ears I clip. It takes a real sheep shearer about 8 minutes to clean an animal…we took about 4 hours to get the job done but can report happily that we didn’t draw blood
The foggy morning and Maggie's going to get a haircut.
We saved Maggie for last…this is her first haircut since she came into our living room last March…click the link below to see her first video

https://searsportshores.com/2013/03/13/little-maggie-the-lamb-first-week-at-searsport-shores-campground-pt-1/

Steve's hand was steady and Maggie was as compliant as an angel
Steve’s hand was steady and Maggie was as compliant as an angel
Maggie munching broccoli after her hair cut
The new Maggie munching broccoli caption][caption id="attachment_3926" align="alignnone" width="361"]Working the dye pot...the objective was to match the colors of the dahlias in the dye garden...mission achieved! As soon as the wool was washed I start working the dye pot…the objective was to match the colors of the dahlias in the dye garden…mission achieved!
Taking time for a hike.  Late this summer we acquired 100+ acres across the street and have plans to develop hiking and biking trails for all of us to enjoy
Plans for the winter? Late this summer we acquired 100+ acres across the street and intend to develop hiking and biking trails for all of us to enjoy

Is it an Gunnell or an Eel?

Is it an Gunnell or an Eel?

Today we took a class of 5th graders and their parents to the shore to explore the tidal pools. When they found an organism, Justin and I told them a few neat facts about them. While searching underneath rocks, an ecstatic boy kept yelling he had caught an eel. This organism was brown/ reddish with a pale belly. It also had dark small speckles along its back and onto its dorsal fin. Justin and I had identified the marine creature as a rock gunnel. They are most commonly mistaken for eels while searching in tidal zones. These animals are in fact fish not eels. The reason for this large misconception is because of its elongated body and long dorsal fin. Both eels and rock gunnels can be found in tidal pools and especially in brackish waters called estuaries. Eels are mostly nocturnal and will also feed on crustacean. They will dig into clams and mussels to eat them from the inside leaving it to appear shut. The biggest difference between the two is that the Rock Gunnel has two small pectoral fins. These fins help the fish maneuver from pool to pool and even dig under rocks. It primarily feeds on smaller fish, worms because it can maneuver quickly unlike the eel. If it can’t catch its prey the Rock Gunnel will feed on some crustacean. During the warm seasons, you can find them all over the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Happy searching.

Maggie Moved Out

Maggie Moved Out

Maggie, our Navajo Churro lamb spent her first night outside yesterday…our bottle fed baby has moved out of the living room at 57 days old and we were all ready for it! We worried she’d be too cold but that was a wasted worry…she’s happy and settled in with the goats forever. To celebrate this morning, we walked everyone to the beach and watched a beautiful tanker just floating in the Bay…someone on board must have been feeding the Sea Gulls because they were screaming with pleasure over the corner of the deck.